venusinthefifth
oursoulsaredamned:

Book of the Dead of the Priest of Horus, Imouthes (Imhotep)
Period: Late Period–Ptolemaic Period Date: 350–250 B.C. Geography: From Egypt, Middle Egypt, Meir (Mir) Medium: Papyrus, ink Dimensions: h. 35.2 x w. 1930.4 cm (13 7/8 x 760 in.) approximately based on sum of sections; originally a continuous roll about 72 feet long.
An Egyptian Book of the Dead is a compilation of incantations designed to assure the deceased admittance to the Hereafter, a good existence after death, and protection from evil powers such as serpents, crocodiles, and various demons. Beginning in Dynasty 18 a papyrus roll containing a selection of these spells was placed in the owner’s tomb, usually either within a statuette of Osiris or within the coffin.
This hieratic papyrus, which is arranged in a series of columns to be read from right to left, contains over 100 spells from the Book of the Dead (known to the ancient Egyptians as Coming Forth by Day). A continuous frieze of vignettes along the top, as well as larger drawings filling the height of the papyrus, illustrate or subsitute for individual incantations. 
This papyrus, along with a second (35.9.19a–o), belonged to the Priest Who Supports The Body of Horus, Imouthes (Imhotep), the son of Psintaes (Pshentehe). His mother was the Musician of Hathor, Lady of Cusae (Meir), Tjehne. Since the family held priestly offices at Meir, where Imhotep’s coffin was found, the two papyri probably come from this Middle Egyptian town.

oursoulsaredamned:

Book of the Dead of the Priest of Horus, Imouthes (Imhotep)

Period: Late Period–Ptolemaic Period Date: 350–250 B.C. Geography: From Egypt, Middle Egypt, Meir (Mir) Medium: Papyrus, ink Dimensions: h. 35.2 x w. 1930.4 cm (13 7/8 x 760 in.) approximately based on sum of sections; originally a continuous roll about 72 feet long.

An Egyptian Book of the Dead is a compilation of incantations designed to assure the deceased admittance to the Hereafter, a good existence after death, and protection from evil powers such as serpents, crocodiles, and various demons. Beginning in Dynasty 18 a papyrus roll containing a selection of these spells was placed in the owner’s tomb, usually either within a statuette of Osiris or within the coffin.

This hieratic papyrus, which is arranged in a series of columns to be read from right to left, contains over 100 spells from the Book of the Dead (known to the ancient Egyptians as Coming Forth by Day). A continuous frieze of vignettes along the top, as well as larger drawings filling the height of the papyrus, illustrate or subsitute for individual incantations. 

This papyrus, along with a second (35.9.19a–o), belonged to the Priest Who Supports The Body of Horus, Imouthes (Imhotep), the son of Psintaes (Pshentehe). His mother was the Musician of Hathor, Lady of Cusae (Meir), Tjehne. Since the family held priestly offices at Meir, where Imhotep’s coffin was found, the two papyri probably come from this Middle Egyptian town.

ereshkegal

ancientart:

Ancient post-it notes!

romkids:

How often do you reach for a Post-It note? Maybe you’re making that to do list, or figuring out your groceries. But you know, what if you lived BEFORE Post-It notes or scrap paper? What would you use then?

In Thebes, where these examples are from, and across the Roman Empire, scraps of used and broken pottery would be used to scribble quick notes. These examples are called ostraka. Most of the ostraka that our conservators and curators are studying right now contain notes on taxes and granary receipts from the second century AD.

The notes are written in Greek script. Kay Sunahara, ROM archaeologist studying these pieces, described the Greek langage at the time as, “the lingua franca of the Mediterranean”. Greek was the most frequently used written language, used to help bridge the gap between speakers of different languages, much like English today.

The majority of these pieces we’re found and acquired in the early 1900’s by none other than ROM founder Charles T. Currelly.

So how are these scrap pieces of pottery useful to archaeology today? Are grocery lists really that vaulabe? For archaeologists, ostraka provide them with a great deal of information about the people who left these notes in the first place. Information such as what people were eating, trading for, in trouble for, and the prices of things, give us a unique look into those who lived far before us, in this case well over a thousand years ago.

Interestingly enough, it also shows us just how similar we are to those who lived long before. Everyone needs groceries, and a reminder letter, maybe from their mom, or from their husband, of what to get from the store.

National Archaeology Day takes place on October 20th at the ROM and many other museums around the world!

venusinthefifth
thegetty:


We cannot know his legendary head with eyes like ripening fruit. And yet his torso is still suffused with brilliance from inside, like a lamp, in which his gaze, now turned to low, gleams in all its power. Otherwise the curved breast could not dazzle you so, nor could a smile run through the placid hips and thighs to that dark center where procreation flared.Otherwise this stone would seem defaced beneath the translucent cascade of the shoulders and would not glisten like a wild beast’s fur: would not, from all the borders of itself, burst like a star: for here there is no place that does not see you. You must change your life. 
Archaic Torso of Apollo by Rainer Maria Rilke

Apollo Crowning Himself, 1781, Antonio Canova. J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

We cannot know his legendary head with eyes like ripening fruit. And yet his torso is still suffused with brilliance from inside, like a lamp, in which his gaze, now turned to low, 

gleams in all its power. Otherwise the curved breast could not dazzle you so, nor could a smile run through the placid hips and thighs to that dark center where procreation flared.

Otherwise this stone would seem defaced beneath the translucent cascade of the shoulders and would not glisten like a wild beast’s fur: 

would not, from all the borders of itself, burst like a star: for here there is no place that does not see you. You must change your life. 

Archaic Torso of Apollo by Rainer Maria Rilke

Apollo Crowning Himself, 1781, Antonio Canova. J. Paul Getty Museum.